Babies Now Equal to Elephants

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File:CircusProcessionElephants1888.jpg
Description "Circus Procession" 1888 artwork showing two elephants in human clothing, one of whom rides a tricycle, a clown, and 3 uniformed ...
(1,853 × 1,265 (2.46 MB)) - 07:28, 5 October 2012
Last Tuesday, the family went to the circus.  We parked the car in the parking lot, and as we were walking towards the circus, I saw a group of people who looked like they were protesting, or picketing.  I didn't want to cross a union picket line; I was concerned.  As I talked with them, I found out that they were representing animal rights groups.  They contend that the animals in the circus, specifically the elephants, were taken out of the wild, where they belong, and forced to work and live in unnatural conditions.

What I think of their contention, is not the point of this post.  The fact that these people were exercising their freedom of speech rights is important. I immediately thought of my friend Eleanor McCullen.  I wrote of her case in front of the Supreme Court in March.  


Because of the "Buffer Zone" law in Massachusetts, Eleanor could not talk to people going into an abortion clinic, like the people concerned about the elephants talked to me.  I also thought of the people who stop me on the street and ask me to sign their petition for this and/or that.  I buy girl scout cookies from little girls who sell out on the sidewalk. And every now and then, I see some people sitting outside the post office who want to impeach the president.

Think of all the people who get their message out by talking to you face to face.  But Eleanor and other pro-lifers, are denied that right, supposedly granted in the First Amendment.

That was Tuesday.  Yesterday-Thursday,  McCullen v. Coakley was decided. It was a unanimous decision.   Eleanor can now talk to people, just like everybody else can.

The sidewalk is public.  The pro-life people can now counsel people.

Justice Roberts said "Petitioners are not protesters."   And I am celebrating over this decison.


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