Lectio Divina for Wednesday of the Third Week of Easter


Wednesday of the Third Week of Easter
Lectio
Gospel John 6: 35-40   The other scriptures of the day are the First Reading  Acts 8: 1B-8 and PS 66:1-3A, 4-5, 6-7A, and the Memorial of St. Martin I – Pope and Martyr, and the Memorial of Blessed Margaret of Costello, according to the Liturgy of Hours for the Order of Preachers.
Jesus does not reject anyone
Jesus said to the crowds,
“I am the bread of life;
whoever comes to me will never hunger,
and whoever believes in me will never thirst.
But I told you that although you have seen me,
you do not believe.
Everything that the Father gives me will come to me,
and I will not reject anyone who comes to me,
because I came down from heaven not to do my own will
but the will of the one who sent me.
And this is the will of the one who sent me,
that I should not lose anything of what he gave me,
but that I should raise it on the last day.
For this is the will of my Father,
that everyone who sees the Son and believes in him
may have eternal life,
and I shall raise him on the last day.”
Studium
The Gospel begins with Jesus declaring that He is the bread of life.  St. Augustine tells us that we will always hunger and thirst for God.  Is not bread called the “staff of life?”  And Jesus begins by telling us that He is Our Bread.  Jesus reproves those who do not believe Him.  …although you have seen me, you do not believe.  Without a deep trust and faith, one cannot satisfy their hunger and thirst for God.  Jesus is there, always.  We need to accept Him because He … will not reject anyone …  Jesus wants us to enter into relationship with Him.  He is offering Himself, completely and forever.  We need not worry that we are not worthy because He promises He will not reject anyone.  This is what God wants.  And if we accept Jesus, we will have eternal life.  Eternal life—where our hunger and thirst will be satiated.
Two examples of deep faith and trust are Pope Martin I, whose feast day we celebrate today, and Blessed Margaret of Costello, who  is venerated by the Order of Preachers.  Pope Martin I suffered greatly, yet held on to his faith.  Martin was elected pope in 649.  It was a tumultuous time for the church.  He was imprisoned and tortured to death.  Martyrdom is the ultimate manifestation of belief in Christ.  Likewise, Blessed Margaret of Costello’s life gave witness to her commitment to Jesus.  Born deformed and blind, in 1287, she was rejected by her parents, but not by God.  …I will not reject anyone who comes to me.  Despite Margaret’s infirmities, she believed.  Physically blind, she saw Jesus with eyes of faith.
Meditatio
Everything that the Father gives me will come to me,
and I will not reject anyone who comes to me,
because I came down from heaven not to do my own will
but the will of the one who sent me.
 
These words of Jesus reassure us of His constant presence.  Sometimes we may question “Where is God?”  God is always there.  He doesn’t move.  We are the ones who move away.  If we are honest with ourselves, we should see that it is we who have loosened our grip on God’s hand.  But we must not worry.  It is God’s will that Jesus not “lose anything of what He gave ...”  Grab hold of Jesus and never let go, as Pope St. Martin I and Blessed Margaret Costello exemplified.  Persevere in trusting God.
Oratio
Bless us Father with Your ever constant grace.  May Your love always embrace us.  Ungrateful as we are wont to be, please accept our petitions.  Help us to persevere in faithfulness.  We want to love You and be with You eternally.  Through the intercession of St. Martin I and Blessed Margaret of Costello may we never let go of Your hand and get lost.  May Jesus always find us.    Amen.
Contemplatio

We remember how You loved us. 
And still we celebrate
For You are with us here.
Lord, we remember; we celebrate;
we believe.

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