How to Write a Psalm


Last weekend, I learned how to write a psalm. It is actually helping me to pray better because I am really focused. Let me show you how to write a psalm.

Psalms are like our usual prayers. They are either praising, asking, or thanking. Psalms, however are written in parallel verses connected together by concept. The writing style in Psalms follow a distinct format called parallelism.

One concept is synonymous parallelism. One thought is stated and the next line states the same thought with different words, i.e.: Psalm 1:5

Therefore the wicked will not survive judgment.
Nor will sinners in the assembly of the just.


Another: Psalm 2:3
Let us break their shackles
and cast off their chains!


Another style of verse is antithetic parallelism. One thought is stated and the next line is the opposite, i.e.: Psalm 1:6

The Lord watches over the way of the just,
but the way of the wicked leads to ruin.


Another: Psalm 20:8
Some rely on chariots, others on horses,
but we on the name of the Lord our God.


One more type of psalm is synthetic parallelism. One thought is stated and the other verses develop that thought, i.e.: Psalm 1

Blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked
Or stands in the way of sinners, nor sits in the seat of mockers
But his delight is in the law of the Lord, and on his law he meditates day and night


There you go. What do you think?

Try writing using one or more of these methods. What did you notice?

I bet your praying has never been better. Aren't you really focused on praising, thanking, asking, or interceding? Writing psalms were be the perfect activity for Adoration.

I owe my Beloved all,
Yet I forget and sin.


Beloved, I believe
I want to believe more.


Mmmmmmmm. Remember it's the intention that counts. Trying to pray is prayer.

*  Related Post  http://theonetruefaith-faith.blogspot.com/2011/01/new-psalm.html

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